Thursday, 22 January 2015

World's highest-earning clubs

Real Madrid recorded a 10th successive year at the top of the Money League thanks to an overall increase of over €30m. Their Champions League triumph helped them raise broadcast revenue to €204.2m and commercial to €231.5m. Only matchday figures fell (by 4% to 113.8m).
Manchester United made a phenomenal leap in revenue in 2013-14, with new commercial deals (€226.4m) earning them 24% more than in the 12 months prior. Despite falling to seventh in the Premier League, United's broadcast revenue also increased by 34% to €162.3m.
Becoming world club champions in 2013-14 helped Bayern Munich to record-breaking revenues. Huge commercial tie-ins accounted for €291.8m of their income, with the relatively small Bundesliga TV pot still bringing in €107.7m to the Allianz Arena.
Barcelona's drop in standards on the field is reflected off it, with only a €2m increase being posted. A relatively even revenue pot was achieved though, with matchday (24%), broadcast (38%) and commercial (38%) takings all registering in excess of €100m.
PSG's monumental returns were largely driven by their €327.7m income from commercial deals. The relatively meagre returns from matchday (€63.1m) and broadcast (€83.4m) say much about the club's reliance on the nine-figure Qatar Tourism Authority commercial contract.
Manchester City were one of a number of English clubs to record new highs for revenue last season. A 28% increase on 2012-13 came thanks in part to €159.3m being made through broadcast deals, up 51%. A sensational €198.3m was made in commercial tie-ins, including the huge Etihad sponsorship contract.
A whopping 25% increase in revenues saw Chelsea post a record financial return in 2013-14. A more lucrative Premier League TV deal helped them recoup €167.3m in broadcasting, while commercial revenue was up by 35% to €135.7m.
Arsenal retain eighth spot after another fourth-place Premier League finish and last-16 Champions League spot. Their 8% increase in matchday revenue to €119.8m came thanks to their victorious FA Cup run, while commercial takings rose by 24% to €92.2m.
Liverpool's return to the top 10 coincided with a much-improved season on the pitch. A 24% rise came thanks largely to them receiving the highest portion of the Premier League's central broadcast pool, helping to record a €120.8m broadcast return. A further €124.1m was made in commercial deals.
Juventus' Champions League struggles contributed towards the Old Lady falling one place, bringing broadcast revenue down by €12.6m to €153.4m. However, their continued boon from having their own new stadium saw them earn €41m (15%) in matchday income.
A slight increase in overall income leads Dortmund to successive 11th-placed rankings. Despite their inability to match 2013's Champions League final appearance, broadcast revenue was down by just €6.1m at €81.5m, with commercial deals adding €123.9m (47%).
For the first time ever, Milan failed to chart in the top 10 after another woeful season off the pitch. Total revenue at Milanello decreased by 5%, with a 13% decline in broadcast cash to €122.7m being partly accountable. Just €24.9m (10%) was made through matchday revenue.
Tottenham's revenue rise of 22% in 2013-14 helped to take them up one place in the Money League, with broadcasting income unsurprisingly accounting for more than half of their total. Matchday revenue earned the club €52.5m (24%), while commercial deals brought in €50m (23%).
Schalke continue to fight the good fight for the Bundesliga despite taking some time to get going on the pitch in 2013-14. The Gelsenkirchen club's revenue grew by almost €16m, with commercial deals (€104.3m) accounting for almost half of their total.
Atletico's stunning season, in which they won La Liga and fell three minutes short of collecting the Champions League title, was only partly reflected on the balance sheet. Although they climbed five places, collecting 57% of their revenue in commercial income, they remain well short of Barcelona and Real Madrid.
Napoli's return to the Champions League brought with it a return to the Deloitte Money League, with broadcasting revenues being boosted by €39.7m on the previous year thanks to Uefa distributions. Another €20.9m was brought in on matchdays, a 38% climb on 2012-13.
Inter slumped to a new low in the Deloitte Money League after a further decline in revenues in 2013-14. Again, the paucity of matchday revenue helped to bring down their income levels, with just €18.8m (11%) coming through the turnstiles.
The only representatives from outside the big five leagues, Galatasaray's financial windfall in 2013-14 came largely thanks to €67.1m in commercial revenues. Their position as Turkey's most popular club helped to account for 41% of their revenues, with matchday and broadcasting adding almost €95m.
A 35% increase in revenues saw Newcastle return to the top 20 despite a relatively poor season on the field. While they made just over €30m on both matchday and commercial revenues, a whopping €93.5m was collected in broadcast deals, thanks largely to the Premier League's Sky TV contract.
A 35% increase in revenues saw Newcastle return to the top 20 despite a relatively poor season on the field. While they made just over €30m on both matchday and commercial revenues, a whopping €93.5m was collected in broadcast deals, thanks largely to the Premier League's Sky TV contract.

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